Intended Audience

Question 1

Imagine you are in a fast-food restaurant where a lady tells you that she had heard there was a gene for liking or hating the taste of cilantro. You looked on the Internet to investigate this statement, and although you found similar comments on reputable websites, you are yet to find any scientific studies supporting this claim.

  • Should you be skeptical about the scientific merit of this claim after browsing the Internet? Why?
  • Do you think there are times when scientifically-sound research is not accepted for publication? Why?
  • What should you do to continue this investigation?
  • Using the University Online Library, find two peer-reviewed articles discussing genetics and food preference. Using the skills you learned from this week’s lectures, summarize each of them.
  • What is a primary source for any research study? Why is it important to read the primary source?
  • Why do most students settle for reading secondhand or thirdhand accounts of research studies instead of reading the primary source?
  • When might you have to depend on a secondary source of information? Are thirdhand accounts of research studies reliable? Why?

Question 2

The Writing Prompt: Write a 6 page proposal for one way to address a food-related ethical problem on our campus or in our communities. Use the following questions for guidance:

• What is a serious, food related ethical problem that needs to be fixed on our campus?

• What is a plausible solution that would best address this problem?

• Why is your solution the most ethical way to address the problem? What ethical principle(s) guide your solution?

• What objections do you expect to face from your intended audience? How can you address their concerns?

• What is at stake in this solution? What should your audience do with your proposal? 

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